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Tick Tock

Tick tock

This is Annie. Annie is a 2-year-old Jack Russell Terrier Cross who has all the energy in the world and always loves a cuddle on the couch at the end of the day. This Christmas she will be travelling to Mallacoota on the east coast for the quintessential Australian family Christmas.

BUT, there’s a danger lurking along the coast and it could be potentially fatal… the paralysis tick. This creepy critter usually loves hanging out along the east coast of Australia (who wouldn’t?!) and especially loves dense bush areas.

Why does the paralysis tick cause so much trouble? Once the tick attaches to a host (such as your pet) it engorges itself with blood and injects a toxin. As the tick slowly grows in size, it continues to inject the toxin over days to weeks so symptoms can be gradual in onset.

Signs to watch out for:

– A change in voice; the meow or bark becomes softer
– Weakness in the back legs
– Vomiting, especially if it happens several times in a day
– A moist cough and difficulties breathing

If the tick is not removed and an anti-serum administered to your pet, your pet can die due to paralysis of the respiratory muscles.

Thankfully there are lots of tick preventatives on the market and Annie has been dispensed a treatment to start before she leaves for her holiday. If your pet needs tick prevention, it is best to discuss the most appropriate product with us. It is also important to realise that not one product is 100% effective so knowing the early signs and performing tick checks on your pet is essential.

Oh, and these little critters can also ‘catch a ride’, and are sometimes found in areas away from the coast. This is just another reason to make yourself familiar with the signs of tick paralysis.

Ask us for more information if you have any questions about tick prevention (or any parasite prevention for that matter). We are always here to help

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